Safeguarding and Child Protection at events.

         Child protection policy statement

 

Gravity Events UK acknowledges the duty of care to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and is committed to ensuring safeguarding practice reflects statutory responsibilities, government guidance and complies with best practice and British Cycling requirements.

 

The policy recognises that the welfare and interests of children are paramount in all circumstances. It aims to ensure that regardless of age, ability or disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sex or sexual orientation, socio-economic background, all children

 

  • have a positive and enjoyable experience of sport at Gravity Events UK events in a safe and child centred environment
  • are protected from abuse whilst participating in DH MTBor outside of the activity.

Gravity Events UK acknowledges that some children, including disabled children and young people or those from ethnic minority communities, can be particularly vulnerable to abuse and we accept the responsibility to take reasonable and appropriate steps to ensure their welfare.  

 

As part of our safeguarding policy Gravity Events UK will

  • promote and prioritise the safety and wellbeing of children and young people
  • ensure everyone understands their roles and responsibilities in respect of safeguarding and is provided with appropriate learning opportunities to recognise, identify and respond to signs of abuse, neglect and other safeguarding concerns relating to children and young people
  • ensure appropriate action is taken in the event of incidents/concerns of abuse and support provided to the individual/s who raise or disclose the concern
  • ensure that confidential, detailed and accurate records of all safeguarding concerns are maintained and securely stored
  • prevent the employment/deployment of unsuitable individuals
  • ensure robust safeguarding arrangements and procedures are in operation.

The policy and procedures will be widely promoted and are mandatory for everyone involved in Gravity Events UK events. Failure to comply with the policy and procedures will be addressed without delay and may ultimately result in dismissal/exclusion from the organisation.

 

Monitoring

 

The policy will be reviewed a year after development and then every three years, or in the following circumstances:

  • changes in legislation and/or government guidance
  • as required by the Local Safeguarding Children Board, UK Sport and/or Home Country Sports Councils and British Cycling
  • as a result of any other significant change or event.

(Last reviewed May 2019)

 

 

 

 

 

Safeguarding Roles and Responsibilities

 

The person with overall responsibility for the event: event coordinator (may also be called the event manager or event organiser)

This is the person appointed to be responsible for the organisation and overall running of the event, including safeguarding all participants and attendees. This person should appoint and work in partnership with an appointed event safeguarding manager and other key members of the event staff.

The event coordinator should not only aim to establish best practice in the recommended standards in the event safeguarding plan, but also to ensure that minimum standards are met by constituent organisations responsible for teams of young people and/or the delivery of specific sports and activities.

The event coordinator is responsible for:

  • appointing/recruiting a suitable person to the role of event safeguarding manager and liaising with this person on all safeguarding related matters before, during and after the event
  • undertaking or delegating an event and facility risk assessment and coordinating venue site visit/s prior to the event to include the event safeguarding manager
  • ensuring the development, implementation and promotion of the event safeguarding plan that establishes minimum safeguarding standards for the event that are communicated to and agreed by constituent sports, clubs, national or regional teams, or local authorities
  • ensuring adequate first-aid/medical cover for the event, which will comply with national governing body, local authority or other requirements
  • in conjunction with the event safeguarding manager making decisions on appropriate responses to any safeguarding or disciplinary issues arising at the event
  • ensuring that a complaints/disciplinary procedure is in place and implemented for participants and staff or volunteers at the event (this should have clear links to the policies and procedures of the participating national governing bodies, schools or local authorities).

 

Event safeguarding coordinator

Reporting to the event coordinator, the event safeguarding manager has overall responsibility for safeguarding at the event. In best practice terms this should not be the same person as the event coordinator due to the complexity of these events and the number of other responsibilities the overall event manager will undoubtedly have, which will impact on their ability to focus on safeguarding.

The event safeguarding manager should have undertaken at least basic safeguarding awareness training, and demonstrate experience of both safeguarding and sports event management.

The event safeguarding manager is responsible for:

  • developing, promoting and implementing the event safeguarding plan that provides minimum operating standards for the event, including details of reporting and referral process.
  • linking with local statutory agencies to ensure that the event safeguarding plan complies with relevant national and local guidance/procedures, and that these agencies are aware of event details in case a significant incident occurs
  • ensuring that plans cover all relevant aspects of the event:

–                 an agreed safe recruitment process for all event and team/school staff and volunteers, including criminal record checks where eligible

–                 registration and consents process

–                 reporting and recording procedures

–                 codes of conduct signed up to by staff and volunteers, participants and parents/spectators, and linked to a disciplinary/sanctions process

–                 basic safeguarding training requirements for staff and volunteers

–                 procedures for missing participants

–                 how safeguarding concerns will be reported, responded to and managed at and after the event (including communication with statutory agencies, national governing bodies, schools and/or local authorities).

  • liaising with those with lead safeguarding responsibilities in participating national or regional or sports teams/clubs/schools/organisations to ensure understanding of and compliance with safeguarding requirements for the event, including:

–                 seeking compliance with the safeguarding standards as identified in the event safeguarding plan

–                 ensuring there is a list of all participants and their next of kin, emergency details,

–                 communicating key information to participants and parent prior to the event

–                 receiving, responding to and managing safeguarding issues as they arise at or after the event

  • ensuring that a complaints/disciplinary procedure is in place and implemented for participants and staff or volunteers at the event (this should have clear links to the policies and procedures of the participating national governing bodies, schools or local authorities)
  • in conjunction with the event coordinator, establishing a system to make decisions on appropriate responses to any safeguarding or disciplinary issues arising at the event – this may involve establishing an event case management panel or triage system
  • agreeing event communication processes for all event safeguarding staff.

 

Other event staff, coaches, team managers, teachers or volunteersThese individuals should:

  • receive the appropriate level of safeguarding training
  • understand their safeguarding responsibilities and what to do in the event of a safeguarding concern arising
  • familiarise themselves with the event safeguarding plan and appropriate lines of communication
  • read and sign up to the relevant event code of conduct.

 

 

 

 

 

Whistle Blowing & sharing of information/ concerns

Gravity Events UK acknowledges the need for a ‘Whistle Blowing Policy’ for safeguarding in line with the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 (PIDA).

 

Whistleblowing occurs when a person raises a concern about dangerous or illegal activity, or any wrongdoing by staff or volunteers, within their organisation. Whistleblowing can involve sharing potentially vital information about health and safety risks, environmental factors, fraud, harm of children or vulnerable adults, covering up for someone and more. It is important to have procedures for enabling staff and volunteers to share, in confidence with a designated person, concerns they may have about a colleague’s behaviour. This may be behaviour linked to child abuse or behaviour that pushes boundaries beyond acceptable limits. Staff or volunteers involved in the event must have the confidence to come forward to speak or act if they are unhappy with anything.

 

In the context of events, the behaviour or attitude of someone towards a child or young person may raise concerns. If this person is a coach, teacher or manager, it may be difficult for someone of perceived lower status (eg a new volunteer) to have the confidence to say anything.However, it is essential that concerns are reported and acted upon as soon as possible. Every situation is different, so it is advisable to contact your event coordinator or designated person for advice before blowing the whistle.

When pursuing a concern:

  • keep calm
  • consider risks and next steps
  • let the facts do the talking – don’t make up allegations
  • don’t pursue the allegation yourself
  • remember that you’re a witness.

 

British Cycling is fully supportive of ‘whistle blowing’ for the sake of the groups, and will provide support and protect those who ‘whistle blow’. While it is difficult to express concerns about colleagues, it is important that these concerns are communicated to the designated officer. All staff and volunteers are encouraged to talk to the designated officer if they become aware of anything that makes them feel uncomfortable.

 

 

Event Organiser – Malc Dunn     

Event safeguarding coordinator– Rachel Alker

 

 

 

 

 

Statutory agencies– police and children’s social care/social services – will follow the local multi-agency procedures in these circumstances.

 

Name

Position

Responsibilities

Malc Dunn

Event Organiser

The Event Organiser is responsible for the overall running of the

event.

Medical Team

Medical

Responsible for the Medical provision at the Event

venues.

Local Hospital

Medical

Medical provision for the

accommodation.

Malc Dunn

Rachel Alker

BC Commisairre

Welfare Team

The Welfare Team will offer support and advice to Team Managers, athletes and other individuals dealing with issues around safeguarding. They will be responsible for taking concerns forward to either the British Cycling Compliance Team, Social Care services or the police, following decision-making at the event.

The Welfare Team will ensure that the venue is a safe and enjoyable environment for the athletes and everyone else involved with the event. They will also hold copies of parental consent forms for riders and personal details for Team

Managers.

Local Safeguarding Children Advisory Service

Safeguarding Manager (9am to 5pm Monday to Friday)

The Welfare Team will make the decisions as to when to contact

the relevant Children’s Social Care service.

Local Social Work Service

(out of hours )

TBC

 

Local Police

TBC

Police unit for referral of child

abuse concerns.

Simon Thornton David Dunlop

British Cycling Compliance Team

0161 274 2002

(event phone number)

The Compliance Team will support you with any Safeguarding concerns you may have.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Child Protection and Safeguarding Information

 

Gravity Events UK acknowledges the duty of care to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and is committed to ensuring safeguarding practice reflects statutory responsibilities, government guidance and complies with best practice and British Cycling requirements.

Principles of participation for children and young people

While these principles mainly apply to the athletes, it is important that parents/carers, staff and volunteers are also aware of and promote them:

  • Fun – you have a right to enjoy your participation in the event.
  • Fair play
    • treat others with the same respect and fairness that you would like to be shown
    • stick to the rules for the event and your sport
    • challenge or speak out about behaviour that falls below the expected standards of the event.
  • Equity
    • demonstrate fair play on and off the track
    • respect differences in gender, disability, culture, race, ethnicity, and religious belief systems between yourself and others
    • appreciate that all participants bring something valuable and different to the event
    • show patience with others
    • challenge discrimination and prejudice.
  • Do not engage in or condone bullying of any sort.
  • Responsibility – look out for yourself and the welfare of others.
  • Do not take part in any irresponsible, abusive, inappropriate or illegal behaviour.
  • Be organised and be on time.
  • Friendship – take time to thank those who help you take part, whether your family, coach, school or teammates.

 

Principles of participation for adults with any event role

Rights:  Staff/volunteers working at any                 event must respect the rights of children and young people,promoting their welfare and their individual needs.

 

Relationships:  Staff/volunteers should                 promote relationships with participants and others that are based on openness, honesty, trust and respect. They must not engage with participants in behaviour that is abusive or inappropriate. They must respond to any concerns about a child’s welfare, and work in partnership with other organisations in the child’s best interests.

 

Responsibilities:Staff/volunteers must demonstrate proper personal/professional behaviour at all times, promoting positive role models for the children and young people they are working with. Staff must ensure that children and young people are provided with a safe environment which maximises benefits and minimises risks to them.

 

Equity:  All staff/volunteers must demonstrate commitment to respecting differences between staff and participants in terms of gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, disability, culture            and religious belief systems.

 

Any allegations/concerns about abuse of children and young people by staff/volunteers must be reported to the event organiser who will refer the situation to the local statutory agencies. The event organiser will have overall responsibility for deciding if the individual should remain at the event or be sent home. Children’s or adults’ social care/social services or the police will offer advice on whom should contact the child’s parents/carers.

 

Allegations or concerns about poor practice (rather than abuse) by event staff or volunteers should also be reported to the event organiser the person with lead safeguarding responsibility who will take steps to initiate the organisation’s complaints or disciplinary procedures.

 

Event Organiser – Malc Dunn           Event safeguarding coordinator– Rachel Alker

 

 

  Child Protection and Safeguarding Information for Event Staff –        Please read the following information

Gravity Events UK acknowledges the duty of care to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and is committed to ensuring safeguarding practice reflects statutory responsibilities, government guidance and complies with best practice and British Cycling requirements.

 

Principles of participation for adults with any event role

Rights:  Staff/volunteers working at any                 event must respect the rights of children and young people,promoting their welfare and their individual needs.

 

Relationships:  Staff/volunteers should                 promote relationships with participants and others that are based on openness, honesty, trust and respect. They must not engage with participants in behaviour that is abusive or inappropriate. They must respond to any concerns about a child’s welfare, and work in partnership with other organisations in the child’s best interests.

 

Responsibilities:Staff/volunteers must demonstrate proper personal/professional behaviour at all times, promoting positive role models for the children and young people they are working with. Staff must ensure that children and young people are provided with a safe environment which maximises benefits and minimises risks to them.

 

Equity:  All staff/volunteers must demonstrate commitment to respecting differences between staff and participants in terms of gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, disability, culture            and religious belief systems.

 

Any allegations/concerns about abuse of children and young people by staff/volunteers must be reported to the event organiser who will refer the situation to the local statutory agencies. The event organiser will have overall responsibility for deciding if the individual should remain at the event or be sent home. Children’s or adults’ social care/social services or the police will offer advice on whom should contact the child’s parents/carers.

 

Allegations or concerns about poor practice (rather than abuse) by event staff or volunteers should also be reported to the event organiser the person with lead safeguarding responsibility who will take steps to initiate the organisation’s complaints or disciplinary procedures.

 

Recognising and responding to concerns

Concerns about the welfare or safety of children can come to light in various ways:

  • we may directly observe worrying behaviour on the part of a child, young person or adult
  • someone (eg another child, spectator or coach) may report seeing or hearing something concerning
  • worrying information may come to light during a recruitment process
  • information may come to light (eg from the police) to indicate that someone involved in the event may represent a risk to others
  • a child may choose to tell someone (disclose) about something that is worrying them –

If a child tells you that he or she is being abused:

  • react calmly so as not to worry, alarm or deter them
  • reassure them that you are glad that they told you
  • don’t promise to keep it to yourself – explain that you need to make sure that they will be safe and may have to pass on the information to someone trusted to deal with it appropriately
  • listen to what the child or young person says and take it seriously
  • only ask questions if you need to clarify what the child is telling you – don’t ask the child about explicit details
  • don’t ask leading questions – a leading question is one that pre-supposes the answer,
  • eg “Sam hit you, didn’t he?”
  • make a detailed record of what the child has told you and don’t delay passing on the information.

Even though it is not your responsibility to decide whether a child or young adult is being abused, you have a duty to act on your concerns. Make a detailed record of what you have seen or heard (preferably using the incident report form), but don’t delay passing on the information to the appropriate person in line with your event safeguarding plan.

 

Your written information should include:

  • the name of the child or young person about whom there are concerns, noting any disability or special needs (eg communication/language) they may have
  • the nature of the concern, suspicion or allegation
  • a description of any visible injury or other physical or behavioural indicators, taking care to be as accurate as you can, eg is the bruise on the right- or left-hand side?
  • the individual’s account of what has happened (whether they are the person to whom it happened or the person reporting it)
  • dates, times and any other factual information, including details of the person suspected or alleged to have harmed the child
  • the distinction between fact, opinion or hearsay.

 

It is never easy to respond to a young person who tells you that they are being abused and you may feel upset and worried yourself. The event organiser should ensure that there is adequate support and an opportunity to debrief, bearing in mind confidentiality. Ideally, the organiser should arrange to provide a quiet area to chill out and talk confidentially.

 

If, at an event, concerns arise that a child or vulnerable young adult may be being abused at home or in the community (eg in school), this must be reported to the event organiser or the person with lead safeguarding responsibility, who will then refer on to local statutory agencies where the child lives. The event organiser should have contact details for police and children’s social care/social services (including “out of hours” services) for the local area.

 

Whistle Blowing & sharing of information/ concerns

Gravity Events UK acknowledges the need for a ‘Whistle Blowing Policy’ for safeguarding in line with the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 (PIDA).

 

Whistleblowing occurs when a person raises a concern about dangerous or illegal activity, or any wrongdoing by staff or volunteers, within their organisation. Whistleblowing can involve sharing potentially vital information about health and safety risks, environmental factors, fraud, harm of children or vulnerable adults, covering up for someone and more. It is important to have procedures for enabling staff and volunteers to share, in confidence with a designated person, concerns they may have about a colleague’s behaviour. This may be behaviour linked to child abuse or behaviour that pushes boundaries beyond acceptable limits. Staff or volunteers involved in the event must have the confidence to come forward to speak or act if they are unhappy with anything.

 

In the context of events, the behaviour or attitude of someone towards a child or young person may raise concerns. If this person is a coach, teacher or manager, it may be difficult for someone of perceived lower status (eg a new volunteer) to have the confidence to say anything.However, it is essential that concerns are reported and acted upon as soon as possible. Every situation is different, so it is advisable to contact your event coordinator or designated person for advice before blowing the whistle.

When pursuing a concern:

  • keep calm
  • consider risks and next steps
  • let the facts do the talking – don’t make up allegations
  • don’t pursue the allegation yourself
  • remember that you’re a witness.

 

British Cycling is fully supportive of ‘whistle blowing’ for the sake of the groups, and will provide support and protect those who ‘whistle blow’. While it is difficult to express concerns about colleagues, it is important that these concerns are communicated to the designated officer. All staff and volunteers are encouraged to talk to the designated officer if they become aware of anything that makes them feel uncomfortable.

 

Event Organiser – Malc Dunn                                                                    Event safeguarding coordinator– Rachel Alker

Copyright belongs to Gravity Events UK and is not to be reproduced in part or whole with to our consent. : june2019